• Roby in 1850, as you can imagine, was a very different place to what it is now. There were only a few minor roads connecting it to the neighbouring settlements of Huyton, Childwall & Prescot, with each village being separated by large open fields used for farming.
  • The newly built Liverpool to Manchester railway was, however, bringing new growth and trade to Liverpool, and passed through Roby as it does today. The business owners & traders did not want to live in the centre of Liverpool, therefore settled in Roby, using the railway as a convenient means to reach their workplaces.
  • More houses were built in Roby, and with the nearest churches being at Huyton & Childwall, the ever-expanding village was in need of a convenient chapel.
  • The land for the church was donated by the Thirteenth Earl of Derby (Lord Derby) in memory of his friend & steward, Richard Earle.
  • Foundation stone laid 24th May 1850 by Rev Ellis Ashton, the then vicar of Huyton Parish Church. Roby was to benefit greatly from the generosity of Ashton, and Huyton Parish Church, over the course of the following years. The architect was Ewan Christian.
  • Building was completed on 2nd November 1850 when the church was licensed for worship by the Bishop of Chester, Bishop John Graham. The first incumbent was Rev. George J. Banner, who was previously curate of Huyton Church.
  • Initially the church was small (only accommodating 122 worshippers) and was without a tower.